Friday, March 13, 2009

Stem Cell Research continued

This morning's paper had an editorial about stem cell research that got my mind back onto that challenge before us.

The writer was not religious, but was concerned over our President's lack of boundary in regards to stem cell research. The President was going to base his policy on "facts of science". Science cannot be an ultimate guide for life in this world, otherwise, we have dissolved life of value or meaning. This writer had been on a Bio-ethics committee under the Bush adminstration, so he was not speaking off the top of his head.

He was concerned that no boundary or definition about 'life" was a disregard of human life. Was any life "made" either thourgh in vitro fertilization or cloning of the same moral fabric? He was making a moral distinction of valuing human life, as to our responsibility for human life. This is where the discussion should be. And it should be a discussion that is free from dogma and ideology, but not free from reasoned boundary concerning human life, if we continue to believe that human life has any value apart from the 'greater good" argument. The author speicifically stated that human life was never to be used as a means, but always an end. That is good moral philosophy. I think most rational people could agree with that.

2 comments:

circuitrider said...

Life can only have true value when we recognize the Giver of life from which life originates. It reminds me of the story of the scientist wanting to create his own, but God tells him he must first make his own dirt...keith 1 Cor 13

Angie Van De Merwe said...

I disagree that one has to understand a "supernaturalistic god". Order based on rationality and planning as to government or organizations don't have to be based on any religious understanding.
Self responsibility and citzenship is based on rational assessment of the value of "law and order". That does not mean that there are times when there is something of more moral importance then "law and order", but it does mean that our rationality itself is the image bearing mark of something other than animal nature.